Posted in Blog Posts, Read Me

The Addams Family, by Charles Addams: a Comic Strip Review

Synopsis:

A series of one panel comic strips that were about an unnamed macabre family that consisted of: a loving father, a stern but compassionate mother, a despondent daughter, a michevious son, an eccentric uncle and a flighty grandmama. 

The strip was published in the New Yorker starting in 1938 and ran throughout the next 40 or so years.  It told moments in the lives of this family, a stark contrast and a satirical look on the white-picked fence and 2.5 kids polished and living in suburban America.

General Information:

-Genre: Dark Humor Comic Strip

-Author/Illustrator: Charles Addams

-Number of Panels: unknown (as far as I can find the strip didn’t have a consistent publishing schedule even though Charles Addams did publish some comic panel in nearly ever issue of the New Yorker Magazine from 1932 to nearly his death in 1988)

-Main Characters: an unnamed family (we now know them as Gomez, Morticia, Wednesday, Pugsley, Uncle Fester and Grandmama)

-Where to Read: old copies of the New Yorker can be found at local libraries and in locally owned antique stores… you can find a variety of the comic’s panels online

-Page of Reference in RPO: 177

Review (contains spoilers):

Super cute but inconsistent and lacking the depth that was given to the characters later onscreen.  The panels are sweet and often funny and a true commentary on the idea that the macabre is automatically bad.  Charles Addams challenged that idea by creating a loving and kind family that had interests the exact opposite of the traditionally accepted interests of America at the time.

Review:

Rating: 2.5 out of 5.

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