Posted in 8-Tracks, Blog Posts

Also Sprach Zarathustra, by Richard Strauss: a Song Review

General Information:

-Album Title: 2001: A Space Odyssey

-Artist: Richard Strauss

-Release Year: 1968

-Song Length: …on the above album about 1:49… in the original context around 30 minutes

-Genre: Orchestral Tonal Poem

-How to Listen: Spotify (linked below), or look for it at your local library!

-Page of Reference in RPO: 107

Some Background:

Since this is an Orchestral piece there aren’t any lyrics to discuss so I felt like some history on this piece and its larger composition was important.

For this I will only be reviewing the first piece made vastly popular by the 1968 film 2001: A Space Odyssey. This section called “Sunrise” is one of the most recognizable pieces of orchestral music in cinematic history particularly on the science-fiction circuit.

This Tonal Poem was written and conducted by Richard Strauss in the late 1800s and was based off of a book written by Nietzsche, Thus Spoke Zarathustra.  Strauss wrote the full composition to be played in succession with only three distinctive pauses.  The piece follows Zarathustra’s philosophical journey, mirroring what he experienced in the novel of the same name.

There is scholarly debate about the ending of the composition.  It ends in two keys with a unfinished finality.  Some speculate this is because Strauss didn’t appreciate Nietzsche’s ending for Zarathustra.

The full composition has been recorded many times over the years first in 1935.  Many orchestras have performed the piece but it is most well known for the Berliner Philharmoniker’s performance for the soundtrack of 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Review:

There isn’t a lot to say about this piece other than I learned something from looking up more information about it to get a better sense of it on it’s own.

Honestly I feel that you need the context of the piece within the film or in the grander scheme of it’s full composition to fully appreciate the depth and story that it tells.

I’ve never been a huge fan of orchestral music on its own.  I am a visual person and I work in film, TV and theatre.  I find that orchestral music on its own while beautiful often feels empty to me without the visual context of how it is used.  Basically you won’t find me sitting in a concert for an orchestra…which really is my loss in the end since I know how incredible those shows can be.

Overall, a beautiful composition but when viewed without the context of the film… or the rest of the music that follows I feel like this piece is just what it is.

The most well known and recognizable piece of science-fiction orchestral music in the world…and really nothing more.

Rating:

Rating: 2 out of 5.

(would be higher in the full context of the visual in 2001: A Space Odyssey or withing the full composition…)

Posted in 8-Tracks, Blog Posts

REPOST: Rebel Yell, by Billy Idol: a Song Review

General Information:

-Album Title: Rebel Yell

-Artist: Billy Idol

-Release Year: 1983

-Song Length: 4:47

-Genre: Rock

-How to Listen: Spotify (with subscription), Apple Music (with subscription), iTunes (for purchase), CD, or look for it at your local library

-Page of Reference in RP1: 184

Lyrics:

Last night a little dancer came dancin’ to my door
Last night a little angel came pumping on my floor
She said come on baby, I got a license for love
And if it expires, pray help from above, because

In the midnight hour, she cried more, more, more
With a rebel yell she cried more, more, more
In the midnight hour babe more, more, more
With a rebel yell more, more, more
More, more, more!

She don’t like slavery, she won’t sit and beg
But when I’m tired and lonely she sleeps in bed
What sets you free and brought you to me, babe
What sets you free, I need you here by me, because

In the midnight hour, she cried more, more, more
With a rebel yell she cried more, more, more
In the midnight hour babe more, more, more
With a rebel yell more, more, more

He lives in his own heaven
Collects it to go from the seven eleven
Well, he’s out all night to collect a fare
Just as long, just as long it don’t mess up his hair

I walked the world for you, babe
A thousand miles for you
I dried your tears, of pain, babe
A million times, for you

I’d sell my soul, for you, babe
For money to burn, for you
I’d give you all, and have none, babe
Just to, just to, just to, just to, to have you here by me, because

In the midnight hour, she cried more, more, more
With a rebel yell she cried more, more, more
In the midnight hour babe, more, more, more
With a rebel yell she cried more, more, more
More, more, more!

Ooh yeah, little baby
She want more
More, more, more, more, more!
Ooh yeah, little angel
She want more
More, more, more, more, more!

Review:

Once again, a song that was a solid 4 because it is generally great overall but nothing spectacular (sorry Billy Idol) gets a 5-star review BECAUSE IT HAS A RIDICULOUS STORY BEHIND IT!

So, Idol himself has confirmed the story behind the title of the song and album.  It all stemmed from a night out at a party with the Rolling Stones where he came upon them drinking a bottle of Bourbon.  The label had a man dressed in Confederate Grey riding a horse.  The brand? Rebel Yell.

The song isn’t about bourbon but only Billy Idol could: 1. Tell a story like that about where he got the title for a song and B. have us all believe it because it’s just that crazy.

He did say the song was about women being the strongest force in the world and the lyrics overall tell the story of the love between a man and a woman.  There has been a lot of speculation about the specifics of what is talked about…but honestly.  Its just a really good song.

The lyrics are solid, the music is catchy.  And it’s just fantastic all around.

And yes, you can still get Rebel Yell Kentucky

Rating:

Rating: 5 out of 5.
Posted in 8-Tracks, Blog Posts

REPOST: Beds Are Burning, by Midnight Oil: a Song Review

General Information:

-Album Title: Diesel and Dust

-Artist: Midnight Oil

-Release Year: 1987

-Song Length: 4:18

-Genre: Rock

-How to Listen: Spotify (with subscription), Apple Music (with subscription), iTunes (for purchase), CD, or look for it at your local library

-Page of Reference in RP1: 63

Lyrics:

Out where the river broke
The blood-wood and the desert oak
Holden wrecks and boiling diesels
Steam in forty-five degrees

The time has come
To say fair’s fair
To pay the rent
To pay our share

The time has come
A fact’s a fact
It belongs to them
Let’s give it back

How can we dance
When our earth is turning
How do we sleep
While our beds are burning

How can we dance
When our earth is turning
How do we sleep
While our beds are burning

The time has come
To say fair’s fair
To pay the rent
Now to pay our share

Four wheels scare the cockatoos
From Kintore East to Yuendemu
The western desert lives and breathes
In forty-five degrees

The time has come
To say fair’s fair
To pay the rent
To pay our share

The time has come
A fact’s a fact
It belongs to them
Let’s give it back

How can we dance
When our earth is turning
How do we sleep
While our beds are burning

How can we dance
When our earth is turning
How do we sleep
While our beds are burning

The time has come
To say fair’s fair
To pay the rent now
To pay our share

The time has come
A fact’s a fact
It belongs to them
We’re gonna give it back

How can we dance
When our earth is turning
How do we sleep
While our beds are burning

Review:

Pretty solid light rock song.  It isn’t hard on the ears…the lyrics are really similar to a lot of what I’m used to hearing throughout the late-‘80s.  Some of it is kind of nonsensical but overall, it’s pretty catchy and is definitely one that I’ll be adding to a few of my personal playlists.

As I looked for the lyrics for this song, I learned that it is a political protest song. Honestly, I’m finding it really interesting that a lot of the music that I’m listening to for this blog happen to be protest songs or off-kilter, off-trend music.  Though I guess that shouldn’t be too odd considering the nature of the book.

So, Midnight Oil is an Australian band… go listen to this song and their other music because its all pretty cool in my opinion.  But this song in particular was a protest against the government in Australia.  Apparently, there was forcible removal of the native Pintupi peoples from the Gibson Desert (it seems like a combination of what happened here in the US to our native peoples as well as the Japanese Internments of the 1940s…and well…if you’ve kept up with the US news the last few years is still occurring to other BIPOC).  These people weren’t and still haven’t been given apologies by the Australian government for their treatment of Aboriginal peoples even now.  Though the Pintupi people seem to be trying to return to their land since the early 1980s.

I find things like this absolutely fascinating because music is just a form of art and art can be so many things.  This song is catchy, the lyrics and melody are really easy to pick up and follow.  You can take it for that.  Or you can look deeper into the lyrics and the background of the band and the song.  And sometimes you find that it was actually something really deep and important.

So important in fact that Midnight Oil’s frontman, Peter Garrett, said of the song: “In retrospect it was the song we were born to record. It’s got all the bits to make it work, strong rhythms, good melody and the lyrics had some punch, while being very Aussie. It took a while to stick. It’s incredible how much it still gets played around the place… Who would have thought an Aboriginal land rights song would travel that far?”

So important that the Australasian Performing Right Association has placed it #3 on their Top 30 Australian Songs of the past 75 years.

And so important that my opinion of the rating for this song went from a 4 out of 5 (as a decent and pretty standard sounding, yet solid, late-1980s song) to a 5 out of 5.

Sometimes knowing what something is about makes it that much more powerful.

Rating:

Rating: 5 out of 5.
Posted in 8-Tracks, Blog Posts

REPOST: The Safety Dance, by Men Without Hats: a Song review

General Information:

-Album Title: Rhythm of Youth

-Artist: Men Without Hats

-Release Year: 1982/1983

-Song Length: 2:44 (extended version: 4:38)

-Genre: Soundtrack, New Wave, Synth-Pop

-How to Listen: Spotify (linked below), Apple Music, Pandora, iHeart Radio, or look for the album at your local library!

-Page of Reference in RPO: 180

Lyrics:

S-A-F-E-T-Y
Safety-dance!

Ah we can dance if we want to, we can leave your friends behind
Cause your friends don’t dance and if they don’t dance
Well they’re are no friends of mine

I say, we can go where we want to, a place where they will never find
And we can act like we come from out of this world
Leave the real one far behind,
And we can dance

We can dance if we want to, we can leave your friends behind
Cause your friends don’t dance and if they don’t dance
Well they’re are no friends of mine
I say, we can go where we want to a place where they will never find
And we can act like we come from out of this world
Leave the real one far behind
And we can dance.

Ah we can go when we want to the night is young and so am i
And we can dress real neat from our hats to our feet
And surprise ’em with the victory cry

I say we can act if want to if we don’t nobody will
And you can act real rude and totally removed
And I can act like an imbecile

I say we can dance, we can dance everything out control
We can dance, we can dance we’re doing it wall to wall
We can dance, we can dance everybody look at your hands
We can dance, we can dance everybody takin’ the chance

Safety dance
Oh well the safety dance
Ah yes the safety dance

S-A-F-E-T-Y
Safety-dance

We can dance if we want to, we’ve got all your life and mine
As long as we abuse it, never gonna lose it
Everything’ll work out right
I say, we can dance if we want to we can leave your friends behind
Cause your friends don’t dance and if they don’t dance
Well they’re are no friends of mine

I say we can dance, we can dance everything out of control
We can dance, we can dance we’re doing it wall to wall
We can dance, we can dance everybody look at your hands
We can dance, we can dance everybody’s takin’ the chance

Oh well the safety dance
Ah yes the safety dance
Oh well the safety dance
Oh well the safety dance
Oh yes the safety dance
Oh the safety dance yeah
Oh it’s the safety dance

It’s the safety dance
Well it’s the safety dance
Oh it’s the safety dance
Oh it’s the safety dance
Oh it’s the safety dance
Oh it’s the safety dance

Review:

This song is something else.

I’ve listened to it throughout my life because my dad was a DJ (in another lifetime).  He always played awesome music around the house.  And I go through phases where all I listen to is insane gems like this one.

And while the song is fun and silly and is really great to dance to it is the music video that is a blast.

So honestly maybe this is more a review of the vintage fantastic-ness that is the idea of a pop song that really doesn’t make much sense lyrics wise (I mean “everyone look at your hands”…really?) set in what I can only guess is a Renaissance Faire in the 1980s.  Which is just fabulous on its own but come on.

A “heroically” dressed guy in a mix of 1980s fashion and really poorly researched Renaissance fashion is partnered with a little person in a full jesters outfit are joined by a girl in a horrid facsimile of peasant wear walking through an old city in Europe(???) and eventually stumble on a parade of people that all go and join up to create some sort of revelry in a renaissance faire -esque setting.

All while singing about how they “can” dance.  And dancing to a ridiculous dance that makes absolutely no sense.

Its just perfection. And the song is the kind of catchy that you get stuck in your head.

Ok…and I just went and looked some things up about it because why not when you are listening to the thing on repeat to get a good feel for the song overall….

And apparently it was written in protest against the bouncers who were tossing people out who were doing the New Wave dances like pogoing (which is a dance that is done by keeping the upper body stiff and jumping or moving around like that).  I guess it was deemed dangerous to other club goers, particularly the disco dancers. 

Which mean it just earned another half point in my book.

Rating:

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

(only because the music video is so absolutely ridiculous that its just vintage perfection at this point! And it’s a protest song…so there…)

Posted in 8-Tracks, Blog Posts

Union of the Snake, by Duran Duran: a Song Review

General Information:

-Album Title: Seven and the Ragged Tiger

-Artist: Duran Duran

-Release Year: 1983

-Song Length: 4:20

-Genre: New Wave, Synthpop

-How to Listen: Spotify (with subscription), Apple Music (with subscription), iTunes (for purchase), CD, or look for it at your local library

-Page of Reference in RP1: 183

Lyrics:

Telegram force and ready
I knew this was a big mistake
There’s a fine line drawing
My senses together
And I think it’s about to break
If I listen close I can hear them singers, oh

Voices in your body coming through on the radio
The union of the snake is on the climb
Moving up it’s gonna race it’s gonna break
Through the borderline

Nightshades on a warning
Give me strength at least give me a light
Give me anything even sympathy
There’s a chance you could be right
If I listen close I can hear them singers, oh

Voices in your body coming through on the radio
The union of the snake is on the climb
Moving up it’s gonna race it’s gonna break
Through the borderline

The union of the snake is on the climb
Moving up it’s gonna race it’s gonna break
Through the borderline

If I listen close I can hear them singers, oh
Voices in your body coming through on the radio
The union of the snake is on the climb
Moving up it’s gonna race it’s gonna break
Through the borderline

The union of the snake is on the climb
It’s gonna race, it’s gonna break, it’s gonna move up
Through the borderline

The union of the snake is on the climb
Moving up it’s gonna race it’s gonna break
Through the borderline

The union of the snake is on the climb
It’s gonna race, it’s gonna break, it’s gonna move up
To the borderline

Review:

This is a Duran Duran song I’m at least familiar with.  I think listening to just two or three songs from a band is really hard to review because you don’t get the chance to feel out what their overall sound is and if they have evolved in their music.

This song is good.  The music makes me want to get up and move…I could vibe to it when I was listening to it for review.  The lyrics are clear and aren’t super repetitive which is a nice change from a lot of what I’ve been listening to lately.

This seems to be a progression of the sound from Duran Duran (though they still do fit firmly in that New Wave of the 1980s sound).  It’s a little fuller…a little more mature.  It feels like the just found “it”.

Not super spectacular.  I’m sure they have other songs I would like more but this one is fine.  It isn’t something I would skip on the radio…but I don’t think it will end up on any of my personal playlists anytime soon.

Rating:

Rating: 4 out of 5.
Posted in 8-Tracks, Blog Posts

The Wild Boys, by Duran Duran: a Song Review

General Information:

-Album Title: The Wild Boys (single)

-Artist: Duran Duran

-Release Year: 1984

-Song Length: 4:18

-Genre: New Wave, Rock

-How to Listen: Spotify (with subscription), Apple Music (with subscription), iTunes (for purchase), CD, or look for it at your local library

-Page of Reference in RP1: 38

Lyrics:

Wild boys, wild boys, wild boys
Wild boys

The wild boys are calling on their way back from the fire
In August moon’s surrender to a dust cloud on the rise
Wild boys fallen far from glory, reckless and so hungered
On the razor’s edge you trail because there’s murder
By the roadside in a sore afraid new world

They tried to break us, looks like they’ll try again

Wild boys never lose it
Wild boys never chose this way
Wild boys never close your eyes
Wild boys always shine

You got sirens for a welcome, there’s bloodstain for your pain
And your telephone been ringing while you’re dancing in the rain
Wild boys wonder where is glory, where is all you angels
Now the figureheads have fell
And lovers war with arrows over secrets they could tell

They tried to tame you, looks like they’ll try again

Wild boys never lose it
Wild boys never chose this way
Wild boys never close your eyes
Wild boys always shine

Wild boys, wild boys, wild boys
Wild boys, wild boys, wild boys

Wild boys never lose it
Wild boys never chose this way
Wild boys never close your eyes
Wild boys always
Wild boys never lose it
Wild boys never chose this way
Wild boys never close your eyes
Wild boys always
Wild boys never lose it
Wild boys never chose this way
Wild boys never close your eyes

Review:

I don’t know much Duran Duran.  This is probably the first song of theirs ive listened to on repeat.  Its an interesting song.

I can’t decide if I like it or not.

For the 1980s New Wave/Rock scene it seems to fit well.  Like so many other songs I’ve reviewed there are the simple repetitive lyrics and a pretty simple beat that makes it catchy to the ear.  But the lyrics are more in line with some of the other bands that tell stories.

I can see why someone who likes bands like Rush and The Police would like Duran Duran. 

Honestly it is really easy to make playlists of a lot of this music to listen to because there are a lot of consistencies in the way the songs sound and feel.  It makes for cohesive and smooth playlists (and sometimes confusing ones where I can’t tell who is singing if I can’t look at the titles…).

I get it…decent song. Fits well into the sound that was coming from the scene in the 1980s.

Rating:

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.
Posted in 8-Tracks, Blog Posts

Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap, by AC/DC: a Song Review

General Information:

-Album Title: Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap

-Artist: AC/DC

-Release Year: 1976

-Song Length: 3:51

-Genre: Hard Rock, Blues Rock, Rock and Roll

-How to Listen: Spotify (with subscription), Apple Music (with subscription), iTunes (for purchase), CD, or look for it at your local library

-Page of Reference in RP1: 328

Lyrics:

If you’re havin’ trouble with the high school head
He’s givin’ you the blues
You want to graduate but not in ‘is bed
Here’s what you gotta do
Pick up the phone
I’m always home
Call me any time
Just ring
36 24 36 hey
I lead a life of crime

Dirty deeds, done dirt cheap
Dirty deeds, done dirt cheap
Dirty deeds, done dirt cheap
Dirty deeds and they’re done dirt cheap
Dirty deeds and they’re done dirt cheap

You got problems in your life of love
You got a broken heart
He’s double dealin’ with your best friend
That’s when the teardrops start, fella
Pick up the phone
I’m here alone
Or make a social call
Come right in
Forget about him
We’ll have ourselves a ball

Dirty deeds, done dirt cheap
Dirty deeds, done dirt cheap
Dirty deeds, done dirt cheap
Dirty deeds and they’re done dirt cheap
Dirty deeds and they’re done dirt cheap

If you got a lady and you want her gone
But you ain’t got the guts
She keeps naggin’ at you night and day
Enough to drive ya nuts
Pick up the phone
Leave her alone
It’s time you made a stand
For a fee
I’m happy to be
Your back door man

Dirty deeds, done dirt cheap
Dirty deeds, done dirt cheap
Dirty deeds, done dirt cheap
Dirty deeds and they’re done dirt cheap yeah
Dirty deeds and they’re done dirt cheap

Concrete shoes, cyanide, TNT
Done dirt cheap
Neckties, contracts, high voltage
Done dirt cheap

Dirty deeds
Do anything you wanna do
Done dirty cheap
Dirty deeds
Dirty deeds
Dirty deeds
Done dirt cheap

Review:

I don’t have a lot to say about this song.  Its classic AC/DC.  One of their most popular songs that most people who listen to any sort of Classic Rock anymore will know or at least recognize.

A fairly solid rock song that was part of early hard rock.

The lyrics are simple and repetitive like a lot of other music from the 1970s and 1980s.  It was easy to sing along to and was catchy which is what you really needed for radio play.

Rating:

Rating: 4 out of 5.
Posted in 8-Tracks, Blog Posts

Synchronicity, by The Police: an Album Review

General Information:

-Album Title: Synchronicity

-Artist: The Police

-Release Year: 1983

-Album Length: 39:42 (44:18 cassette and CD editions)

-Genre: New Wave, Post-Punk

-How to Listen: Spotify (with subscription), Apple Music (with subscription), iTunes (for purchase), CD, or look for it at your local library

-Page of Reference in RP1: 63

Songs:

A Side:

  1. Synchronicity I
  2. Walking in Your Footsteps
  3. O My God
  4. Mother
  5. Miss Gradenko
  6. Synchronicity II

B Side:

  1. Every Breath You Take
  2. King of Pain
  3. Wrapped Around Your Finger
  4. Tea in the Sahara
  5. Murder by Numbers (bonus track on cassette and CD)

Review:

So, for me it is really the song Every Breath You Take on this album that seals the solid 4 I am rating it.

Because I love a good story behind a song.  And I love a good song that tells a story.

Here is where I think we start to hear less of The Police and more of Sting and his personal sound.  While he has always been the front man of the group it is really in the last two albums that his essence is starting to come through and what eventually came out in his solo career.

But it is the story that Sting has told on so many occasions that makes me laugh.  The song Every Breath You Take is one of the most notable and well-known songs that The Police ever performed.  The story in the song is that of a stalker.  A man stalking a woman…and singing about it.  It is creepy and eerie… and is an excellent song.  What is insane is that most people don’t listen to the lyrics. To the point that Sting has had MULTIPLE couples have told him that this song was “their song”. 

Creepy, and really concerning considering the content of the song…

Overall, this album feels the closest to where Sting began his solo career.  The music is a bit different than the previous albums but that isn’t a bad thing.  They seem to have left the Reggae behind and have come into more of a pop/rock sound.  It is really nice to hear the change in this album.

Rating:

Rating: 4 out of 5.
Posted in 8-Tracks, Blog Posts

Ghost in the Machine, by The Police: an Album Review

General Information:

-Album Title: Ghost in the Machine

-Artist: The Police

-Release Year: 1981

-Album Length: 41:03

-Genre: New Wave, Avant-Pop

-How to Listen: Spotify (with subscription), Apple Music (with subscription), iTunes (for purchase), CD, or look for it at your local library

-Page of Reference in RP1: 63

Songs:

A Side:

  1. Spirits in the Material World
  2. Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic
  3. Invisible Sun
  4. Hungry for you (J’aurais toujours faim de toi)
  5. Demolition Man

B Side:

  1. Too Much Information
  2. Rehumanize Yourself
  3. One World (Not Three)
  4. Omegaman
  5. Secret Journey
  6. Darkness

Review:

Even though I knew some of the songs on the earlier albums this one and Zenyatta Mondatta have some of the songs I recognize the most.  Spirits in the Material World and Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic are some of my favorites with One World (Not Three), Rehumanize Yourself, and Demolition Man are all songs that I know well.

I think these songs as well as the notable songs on Zenyatta Mondatta have the essential sound that I know so well as The Police.  While the Raggae Rock sound of the other songs on their albums is really apparent it is these songs that really create the solid “Police” sound that most people know.

Once again…the other songs on the album are fine…but its these big songs, the singles, the popular ones that are the songs that dictated the rating on this album in my opinion.

Rating:

Rating: 4 out of 5.
Posted in 8-Tracks, Blog Posts

Zenyatta Mondatta, by The Police: an Album Review

General Information:

-Album Title: Zenyatta Mondatta

-Artist: The Police

-Release Year: 1980

-Album Length: 38:16

-Genre: New Wave, Post-Punk, Reggae Rock

-How to Listen: Spotify (with subscription), Apple Music (with subscription), iTunes (for purchase), CD, or look for it at your local library

-Page of Reference in RP1: 63

Songs:

A Side:

  1. Don’t Stand So Close to Me
  2. Driven to Tears
  3. When the World is Running Down, You Make the Best of What’s Still Around
  4. Canary in a Coalmine
  5. Voices Inside My Head
  6. Bombs Away

B Side:

  1. De Do Do Do, De Da Da Da
  2. Behind My Camel
  3. Man in a Suitcase
  4. Shadows in the Rain
  5. The Other Way of Stopping

Review:

I think this is the album that I knew the most of going into this project.

Songs like Don’t Stand So Close to Me, Canary in a Coalmine, De Do Do Do De Da Da Da and Shadows in the Rain were all played frequently in my house and are ones that I grew up hearing.

I love the lyrics to these songs because they tell stories.  They aren’t always stories about happy things, but The Police do a wonderful job with telling the stories they want to tell.  In the case of Don’t Stand so Close to Me (which is probably one of their most recognizable songs) talks about a teacher-student relationship…and the teacher trying to stay away from it…or are they?

Musical lyrics like this are always something I find intriguing.  I’m more likely to enjoy a song if there is truly as story being told.

This is the case with this album.  The songs that I know have definitely raised its rating.  Like all of their other albums, the songs that didn’t become well known are just fine.  Not spectacular but fine.

Rating:

Rating: 4 out of 5.