Posted in 8-Tracks, Blog Posts

Reggatta de Blanc, by The Police: an Album Review

General Information:

-Album Title: Reggatta de Blanc

-Artist: The Police

-Release Year: 1979

-Album Length: 41:52

-Genre: New Wave, Post-Punk, White Reggae, Reggae Rock

-How to Listen: Spotify (with subscription), Apple Music (with subscription), iTunes (for purchase), CD, or look for it at your local library

-Page of Reference in RP1: 63

Songs:

A Side:

  1. Message in a Bottle
  2. Reggatta de Blanc
  3. It’s Alright for You
  4. Bring on the Night
  5. Deathwish

B Side:

  1. Walking on the Moon
  2. On Any Other Day
  3. The Bed’s Too Big Without You
  4. Contact
  5. Does Everyone Stare
  6. No Time This Time

Review:

Two of my favorite songs from The Police are on this album.  Message in a Bottle and Walking on the Moon. 

Like their first album this one is the essential sound of The Police.  I find it interesting that their sound never really changed through all their albums.  There is a core rhythm and style that doesn’t seem to change over the years.  Its kind of impressive that they found their sound so early on.  And it is quite distinctive. 

But I do really just like the songs that got the radio time.  The ones that most people over 30 know…the ones a lot of us grew up with.  Otherwise the rest of the album is just fine. 

Rating:

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.
Posted in 8-Tracks, Blog Posts

Outlandos d’Amor, by The Police: an Album Review

General Information:

-Album Title: Outlandos d’Amor

-Artist: The Police

-Release Year: 1978

-Album Length: 38:14

-Genre: New Wave, Post-Punk, Punk Rock, Reggae Rock

-How to Listen: Spotify (with subscription), Apple Music (with subscription), iTunes (for purchase), CD, or look for it at your local library

-Page of Reference in RP1: 63

Songs:

A Side:

  1. Next to You
  2. So Lonely
  3. Roxanne
  4. Hole in My Life
  5. Peanuts

B Side:

  1. Can’t Stand Losing You
  2. Truth Hits Everybody
  3. Born in the ‘50s
  4. Be My Girl – Sally
  5. Masoko Tanga

Review:

Ah The Police.  I grew up with this band as well as Sting being played in my house frequently.

I was surprised listening through this album that one of their most famous songs, and a personal favorite of theirs, was on their debut album: Roxanne.

Other than that, the album is ok. Nothing spectacular to me but also not something I disliked listening to.   It’s a pretty solid album that feels like The Police to me.  I’ve found this isn’t always the case when it comes to the music I’m familiar with and the early albums of that band.  But this debut album is a pretty good view of their sound and their lyrics.

Honestly, other than Roxanne I can’t really pick out any of the other songs that I really liked or that were distinctive.  They all kind of blend together in a way where if you are not paying attention to the change in title it sounds like it could almost be a cohesive song without much change overall.

Like I said.  It’s a fine debut album, but nothing earth shattering.

Rating:

Rating: 3 out of 5.
Posted in 8-Tracks, Blog Posts

Atomic, by Blondie: a song review

General Information:

-Album Title: Eat to the Beat

-Artist: Blondie

-Release Year: 1980

-Song/Album Length: 4:40

-Genre: New Wave, Rock, Disco

-How to Listen: Spotify (with subscription), Apple Music (with subscription), iTunes (for purchase), CD, or look for it at your local library

-Page of Reference in RP1: 189

Lyrics:

Uh huh make me tonight
Tonight make it right
Uh huh make me tonight
Tonight
Tonight
Oh uh huh make it magnificent
Tonight
Right
Oh your hair is beautiful
Oh tonight
Atomic
Tonight make it magnificent
Tonight
Make me tonight
Your hair is beautiful
Oh tonight
Atomic
Atomic
Oh

Review:

I just….yeah.  This song is great if you’re in a club and just want to vibe.  But other than that, it seems kind of useless…

It doesn’t seem to fit into the disco genre it is listed as.  Its just kind of a good vides song.  But isn’t much more than that.  Nonsense lyrics and a mellow beat…nothing spectacular.

Rating:

Rating: 2 out of 5.
Posted in 8-Tracks, Blog Posts

Time After Time, by Cyndi Lauper: a Song Review

General Information:

-Album Title: She’s So Unusual

-Artist: Cyndi Lauper

-Release Year: 1983

-Song Length: 4:01

-Genre: Soft Rock, New Wave

-How to Listen: Spotify (with subscription), Apple Music (with subscription), iTunes (for purchase), CD, or look for it at your local library

-Page of Reference in RP1: 185

Lyrics:

Lying in my bed, I hear the clock tick and think of you
Caught up in circles
Confusion is nothing new
Flashback, warm nights
Almost left behind
Suitcase of memories
Time after

Sometimes you picture me
I’m walking too far ahead
You’re calling to me, I can’t hear
What you’ve said
Then you say, “go slow”
And I fall behind
The second hand unwinds

If you’re lost you can look and you will find me
Time after time
If you fall, I will catch you, I’ll be waiting
Time after time
If you’re lost, you can look and you will find me
Time after time
If you fall, I will catch you, I will be waiting
Time after time

After my picture fades and darkness has
Turned to gray
Watching through windows
You’re wondering if I’m okay
Secrets stolen from deep inside (deep inside)
And the drum beats out of time

If you’re lost you can look and you will find me
Time after time
If you fall I will catch you, I’ll be waiting
Time after time
If you’re lost, you can look and you will find me
Time after time
If you fall, I will catch you, I will be waiting
Time after time
Time after time

I’ve got a suitcase of memories that I almost left behind
Time after time
Time, time, time
But you say to go slow but I fall behind
Time after time after time (after time, oh)

Review:

This is one of those songs that if you’ve listened to basically any ‘80s music station you will probably have heard this song.

Cyndi Lauper is such a classic when it comes to 1980s music.  It is really fascinating that so much of the music that is mentioned in the book is the music that I grew up with.

I literally haven’t heard this song in years, and I could sing to the entire thing without really thinking about it.  Its that kind of catchy.  The type that you could have not heard in forever then you hear it once and you’ll be singing it for days.

Like most 1980s pop this song has very repetitive lyrics but the tune is catchy and you can understand the emotion and feeling that she was trying to convey in the song.  While she is most well known for her “Girls Just Want to have Fun” this is honestly one of my favorite songs of hers.

She does tell a great story in this song, and I think that for anyone who has felt the emotions of feeling inadequate in their relationship has felt the way that Lauper speaks of in the song. 

For as synth-pop as this song is with the clock-ticking in the background and the bright guitar melody it does have so much depth in such a short amount of time.

I truly do love this song and how much Cyndi Lauper was able to get into this song…and she wrote the lyrics herself. 

Rating:

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.
Posted in 8-Tracks, Blog Posts

Rush, by Rush: an Album Review

General Information:

-Album Title: Rush

-Artist: Rush

-Release Year: 1974

-Album Length: 39:51

-Genre: Hard Rock, Heavy Metal

-How to Listen: Spotify (with subscription), Apple Music (with subscription), iTunes (for purchase), CD, or look for it at your local library

-Page of Reference in RP1: Rush is Halliday’s favorite band and as such is mentioned early and often throughout the book

Songs:

A Side:

  1. Finding my Way
  2. Need Some Love
  3. Take a Friend
  4. Here Again

B Side:

  1. What You’re Doing
  2. In the Mood
  3. Before and After
  4. Working Man

Review:

I listened to this album for an hour straight the other day.  Its really interesting to see what was considered heavy metal and hard rock in the past.  Because I can hear the influences to this album…and to me that is about as far from heavy metal as you can get.

You can definitely hear moments of Led Zeppelin and Cream, even Jethro Tull.  They were clearly (and continued to be) influenced by British bands and wanting to push the limits of their music and what was considered to fall into the hard rock genre of the time.

I really enjoyed the album overall.  It was a solid start for a band that was making music well into 2015…such a long run for them.

It will be interesting to see how their albums changed as they and their influences grew and changed.

Rating:

Rating: 4 out of 5.
Posted in 8-Tracks, Blog Posts

REPOST: Dead Man’s Party, by Oingo Boingo: a Song Review

General Information:

-Album Title: Dead Man’s Party

-Artist: Oingo Boingo

-Release Year: 1985

-Song/Album Length: 6:21

-Genre: New Wave

-How to Listen: Spotify (linked below), Apple Music, iHeart Radio, Pandora, or find the album at your local library!

-Page of Reference in RPO: 3

Lyrics:

I’m all dressed up with nowhere to go
Walkin’ with a dead man over my shoulder
I’m all dressed up with nowhere to go
Walkin’ with a dead man over my shoulder

Waiting for an invitation to arrive
Goin’ to a party where no one’s still alive
Waiting for an invitation to arrive
Goin’ to a party where no one’s still alive

I was struck by lighting, walkin’ down the street
I was hit by something last night in my sleep
It’s a dead man’s party who could ask for more?
Everybody’s comin’, leave your body at the door
Leave your body and soul at the door

Don’t run away it’s only me
Only me

I’m all dressed up, nowhere to go
Walkin’ with a dead man (oh!) with a dead man
Ooh ooh, waitin’ for an invitation to arrive
Ooh! Walkin’ with a dead man, dead man (with a dead man)

I got my best suit and my tie
With a shiny silver dollar on either eye
I hear the chauffeur comin’ to my door
Says there’s room for maybe just one more

I was struck by lighting, walkin’ down the street
I was hit by something last night in my sleep
It’s a dead man’s party, who could ask for more?
Everybody’s comin’, leave your body at the door
Leave your body and soul at the door

Don’t run away it’s only me
Don’t be afraid of what you can’t see
Don’t run away it’s only me (only me)
Don’t be afraid of what you can’t see

It’s only me

I was struck by lighting, walkin’ down the street
I was hit by something last night in my sleep
It’s a dead man’s party, who could ask for more?
Everybody’s comin’, leave your body at the door
Leave your body and soul at the door

Don’t run away it’s only me (only me)
Don’t be afraid of what you can’t see
Don’t run away it’s only me (only me)
Don’t be afraid of what you can’t see

It’s only me

It’s only me
Only me
It’s only me
It’s only me
Only me (only me)
It’s only me
It’s only me
It’s only me
Ow!

Review:

While Oingo Boingo wasn’t often played in my house growing up I was super lucky to have been introduced to a ton of different music from the 1980s growing up.  Overall, I do really like this song.  Its rhythm and beat are catchy, and the lyrics are quite entertaining.

In the context of RPO I do understand why the character of Halliday chose this song to set his last will and testament to.  It has just enough of the morbid humor I feel he would have possessed as well as just having that genuine 1980s feel.  There is little chance of thinking that this song was made in any other time period.  Its just distinctly 80s.

The lyrics truly do feel like the fit the context of his will as well.  While he is dead it has the feel of a dance song which was fitting because he used this video to announce that he had built a contest into the OASIS.  This song has that kind of mischievous and upbeat feel in contrast to the idea of the lyrics.

Which I’m finding the more and more I research New Wave music seems to kind of be a running theme.

This song is also the first introduction to Halliday’s character and the fact that he likes to hide clues and little nods to his life throughout his work…and that sometimes what looks innocent actually holds a really important piece of information that you may need.

Rating:

Rating: 4 out of 5.

Posted in 8-Tracks, Blog Posts

The Safety Dance, by Men Without Hats: a Song review

General Information:

-Album Title: Rhythm of Youth

-Artist: Men Without Hats

-Release Year: 1982/1983

-Song Length: 2:44

-Genre: Soundtrack, New Wave, Synth-Pop

-How to Listen: Spotify (linked below), Apple Music, Pandora, iHeart Radio, or look for the album at your local library!

-Page of Reference in RPO: 180

Lyrics:

S-A-F-E-T-Y
Safety-dance!

Ah we can dance if we want to, we can leave your friends behind
Cause your friends don’t dance and if they don’t dance
Well they’re are no friends of mine

I say, we can go where we want to, a place where they will never find
And we can act like we come from out of this world
Leave the real one far behind,
And we can dance

We can dance if we want to, we can leave your friends behind
Cause your friends don’t dance and if they don’t dance
Well they’re are no friends of mine
I say, we can go where we want to a place where they will never find
And we can act like we come from out of this world
Leave the real one far behind
And we can dance.

Ah we can go when we want to the night is young and so am i
And we can dress real neat from our hats to our feet
And surprise ’em with the victory cry

I say we can act if want to if we don’t nobody will
And you can act real rude and totally removed
And I can act like an imbecile

I say we can dance, we can dance everything out control
We can dance, we can dance we’re doing it wall to wall
We can dance, we can dance everybody look at your hands
We can dance, we can dance everybody takin’ the chance

Safety dance
Oh well the safety dance
Ah yes the safety dance

S-A-F-E-T-Y
Safety-dance

We can dance if we want to, we’ve got all your life and mine
As long as we abuse it, never gonna lose it
Everything’ll work out right
I say, we can dance if we want to we can leave your friends behind
Cause your friends don’t dance and if they don’t dance
Well they’re are no friends of mine

I say we can dance, we can dance everything out of control
We can dance, we can dance we’re doing it wall to wall
We can dance, we can dance everybody look at your hands
We can dance, we can dance everybody’s takin’ the chance

Oh well the safety dance
Ah yes the safety dance
Oh well the safety dance
Oh well the safety dance
Oh yes the safety dance
Oh the safety dance yeah
Oh it’s the safety dance

It’s the safety dance
Well it’s the safety dance
Oh it’s the safety dance
Oh it’s the safety dance
Oh it’s the safety dance
Oh it’s the safety dance

Review:

This song is something else.

I’ve listened to it throughout my life because my dad was a DJ (in another lifetime).  He always played awesome music around the house.  And I go through phases where all I listen to is insane gems like this one.

And while the song is fun and silly and is really great to dance to it is the music video that is a blast.

So honestly maybe this is more a review of the vintage fantastic-ness that is the idea of a pop song that really doesn’t make much sense lyrics wise (I mean “everyone look at your hands”…really?) set in what I can only guess is a Renaissance Faire in the 1980s.  Which is just fabulous on its own but come on.

A “heroically” dressed guy in a mix of 1980s fashion and really poorly researched Renaissance fashion is partnered with a little person in a full jesters outfit are joined by a girl in a horrid facsimile of peasant wear walking through an old city in Europe(???) and eventually stumble on a parade of people that all go and join up to create some sort of revelry in a renaissance faire -esque setting.

All while singing about how they “can” dance.  And dancing to a ridiculous dance that makes absolutely no sense.

Its just perfection. And the song is the kind of catchy that you get stuck in your head.

Ok…and I just went and looked some things up about it because why not when you are listening to the thing on repeat to get a good feel for the song overall….

And apparently it was written in protest against the bouncers who were tossing people out who were doing the New Wave dances like pogoing (which is a dance that is done by keeping the upper body stiff and jumping or moving around like that).  I guess it was deemed dangerous to other club goers, particularly the disco dancers. 

Which mean it just earned another half point in my book.

Rating:

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

(only because the music video is so absolutely ridiculous that its just vintage perfection at this point! And it’s a protest song…so there…)

Posted in Blog Posts, Flick Central

Schoolhouse Rock!, created by David McCall: a Video Shorts Review

Synopsis:

A series of Educational Children’s Shorts that were mostly written in the 1970s and played on children’s television in between cartoons and other family programs to help to teach abstract or difficult concepts in bite sized songs that could and would carry through with them until adulthood.  The Compilations are as follows with their subject in italics after the song title:

Multiplication Rock:

  1. Elementary, My Dear – multiplying by 2
  2. Three Is a Magic Number – multiplying by 3
  3. The Four-Legged Zoo – multiplying by 4
  4. Ready or Not, Here I Come – multiplying by 5
  5. I Got Six – multiplying by 6
  6. Lucky Seven Sampson – multiplying by 7
  7. Figure Eight – multiplying by 8
  8. Naughty Number Nine – multiplying by 9
  9. My Hero, Zero — multiplying by 10
  10. The Good Eleven – multiplying by 11
  11. Little Twelvetoes – multiplying by 12

Grammar Rock:

  1. A Noun is a Person, Place or Thing – what is a noun?
  2. Verb: That’s What’s Happening – the function of verbs
  3. Conjunction Junction – how conjunctions work
  4. Interjections! – using interjections in sentences!
  5. Unpack Your Adjectives – what does an adjective effect?
  6. Lolly, Lolly, Lolly, Get Your Adverbs Here – how do you use adverbs?
  7. Rufus Xavier Sarsparilla – utilizing pronouns to shorten sentences
  8. Busy Prepositions – what is a preposition and what does it do?
  9. The Tale of Mr. Morton – subjects and their predicates

America Rock:

  1. No More Kings – the story of American Independence
  2. The Shot Heard Around the World – the start to the American Revolutionary War
  3. The Preamble – the first part of the American Constitution
  4. Sufferin’ ‘till Suffrage – the Women’s Suffrage Movement!
  5. I’m Just a Bill – how does a bill become a law?
  6. The Great American Melting Pot – Immigration and how wonderful it is for America
  7. Elbow Room – the Territorial evolution of the US
  8. Fireworks – how the Declaration of Independence came to fruition
  9. Mother Necessity – the story of inventions and inventing
  10. Three Ring Government – what the branches of American Government do
  11. I’m Gonna Send Your Vote to College – how the Electoral College works
  12. Presidential Minute (The Campaign Trail) – Voting for the President

Science Rock:

  1. Victim of Gravity – how gravity works
  2. Interplanet Janet – the solar system and plants
  3. The Body Machine – how the digestive system works
  4. Do the Circulation – body circulation
  5. The Energy Blues – conserving energy
  6. The Not-So-Dry Bones – how your skeletal system works
  7. Electricity, Electricity – all about electricity
  8. Telegraph Line – what does your nervous system do
  9. The Greatest Show on Earth (The Weather Show) – WEATHER!

Money Rock:

  1. Dollars and Sense – how interest and loans
  2. Tax Man Max – taxes
  3. Where the Money Goes – family budget, bills, and expenses
  4. $7.50 Once a Week – personal budgeting
  5. Tyrannosaurus Debt – budget deficit and the US National Debt
  6. This for That – Bartering and the history of currency
  7. Walkin’ on Wall Street – how the stock exchange
  8. The Check’s in the Mail – how to use checks

Earth Rock:

  1. Report from the North Pole – what is Climate Change?
  2. The Little Things We Do – Global Energy conservation
  3. The Trash Can Band – how Recycling works
  4. You Ought Be Savin’ Water – Global water conservation
  5. The Rainforest – all about the rainforests
  6. Save the Ocean – global Ocean conservation
  7. Fat Cat Blue: The Clean Rivers Song – marine debris and how to help
  8. A Tiny Urban Zoo – gardening!
  9. Solar Power to the People – solar energy
  10. Windy and the Windmills – wind energy
  11. Don’t Be a Carbon Sasquatch – reducing carbon footprints
  12. The 3 R’s – Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

General Information:

-Genre: Educational Music Videos

-Creator: David McCall

-Length: vary in length…no more than 5 minutes each with most clocking in at around the 3 minute mark

-Rating: TV-E (children’s educational songs mostly from the 1970s so there are a few clips with a cat smoking or other “questionable” materials…)

-Where to Watch: Disney+ (with subscription), DVD, Blu-Ray, or look for it at your local library

-Page of Reference in RP1: 63

Review (contains spoilers):

Multiplication Rock:

I grew up listening to this CD and watching the songs when they were on TV between cartoons on Saturday mornings.  To this day I still can’t do some of my multiplication tables without singing some of the songs.  They are incredibly effective. 

The music is catchy and easy for kids to understand.  The tunes stick in your head years later.  They teach the concepts quickly and in ways that are memorable which is what good educational programming should do.

Grammar Rock:

Just like with Multiplication Rock, I grew up listening to these on CD.  I love how they took more complicated concepts like conjunctions and predicates (which as an adult I still don’t always remember how they work… I just know they do) and made them easy for kids to learn and use.  Like all of the other Schoolhouse Rock! songs, these are incredibly catchy and memorable.  They do a great job with all of the difficult concepts for kids to learn!  And who doesn’t need better grammar these days?

America Rock:

This is a series that I know I saw in bits and pieces as a kid but don’t know by heart the way I know multiplication rock and grammar rock.  The songs are quite decent in this series but do tend to gloss over some of the more difficult moments in history (like the Louisiana Purchase going smoothly and totally not stealing the land from Indigenous people….ugh) but I think the general concepts are pretty decent.

There are a few songs I really love like The Preamble which got me out of a few tests and a LOT of bonus points in government classes through the years, and The Great American Melting Pot because we should hold the idea that we welcome all immigrants to our land.

Overall, this isn’t my favorite of the Schoolhouse Rock! series.

Science Rock:

I didn’t grow up with these.  I discovered them later in life when I bought the 30th anniversary DVD release.  These ones would have been so helpful in school, but I still love them now as an adult.  From the 1950s sock hop rock to the wonderful Interplanet Janet and her catchy ride through the stars it is hard to get upset with these ones.  Really fun renditions of proven scientific theories like gravity, how your body works and how to conserve energy…even the weather.  They are like 3-minute Magic Schoolbus Episodes.  And that is awesome.

Money Rock:

I am looking for the videos of all of these to do a proper review… this will be updated.

Earth Rock:

I am looking for the videos of all of these to do a proper review….this will be updated.

Final thoughts:

Overall, I highly recommend this series to people with kids. There are some questionable moments because it was made mostly in the 1970s and some of what is deemed “acceptable” is different now but none of it really felt troubling or damaging upon re-watch.  Definitely be willing to talk to your kids about why some of the things they animate aren’t ok (the man chasing the woman during “pursuit of happiness” in Fireworks comes to mind).

I love that the music styles and animation styles change for nearly every song.  It makes all of them so distinct and more difficult to mix up when you are trying to recall the information they were talking about and teaching.

Rating:

Rating: 4 out of 5.
Posted in 8-Tracks, Blog Posts, The GATES

Three is a Magic Number, by School House Rock!: a Song review

General Information:

-Album Title: Multiplication Rock

-Artist: Bob Dorough

-Release Year: 1973

-Song Length: 3 minutes

-Genre: Educational Music

-How to Listen: Spotify (with subscription), Apple Music (with subscription), iTunes (for purchase), CD, or look for it at your local library

-Page of Reference in RP1: 308

Lyrics:

Three is a magic number
Yes it is, it’s a magic number
Somewhere in that ancient mystic trinity
You get three as a magic number
The past and the present and the future
Faith and hope and charity
The heart and the brain and the body
Give you three as a magic number

It takes three legs to make a tripod or to make a table stand
It takes three wheels to make a vehicle called a tricycle
And every triangle has three corners
Every triangle has three sides
No more, no less, you don’t have to guess
When it’s three, you can see
Its a magic number

A man and a woman had a little baby
Yes, they did
They had three in the family
And that’s a magic number

Three, six, nine
Twelve, fifteen, eighteen
Twenty-one, twenty-four, twenty-seven
Thirty
(Three, six, nine
Twelve, fifteen, eighteen
Twenty-one, twenty-four, twenty-seven
Thirty)

Now the multiplies of three
Come up three times in each set of ten
In the first ten
You get three, six, nine
And in the teens’ ten
It’s twelve, fifteen and eighteen
And in the twenties you get-a
Twenty-one, twenty-four, twenty-seven
And it comes out even on thirty

Three times ten is (thirty)
Three times nine is (twenty-seven)
Three times eight is (twenty-four)
Three times seven is (twenty-one)
Three times six is eighteen
Three times five is fifteen
Three times four is twelve
And three times three is nine
And three times two is six
And three times one is three, of course
(Now dig the pattern once more!)

Twelve, fifteen, eighteen (Twenty-one)
Twenty-one, twenty-four, twenty-seven
Thirty (Yeah)

Three times ten is (thirty)
Three times nine is (twenty-seven)
Three times eight is (twenty-four)
Three times seven is (twenty-one)
Three times six is eighteen
Three times five is fifteen
Three times four is twelve
And three times three is nine
And three times two is six
And three times one
What is it? (Three)
Yeah, thats a magic number

A man and a woman had a little baby
Yes, they did
There had three in the family
That’s a magic number

Review:

I grew up listening to School House Rock!… Three is a Magic Number was one of my favorites.  They are beautiful songs used to help children learn different subjects.  Some are better than others but this one is truly one of the best.

I did a little research of it for my review because I didn’t know much about the song other than I love the whole thing…its sweet and catchy and simple to remember and sing (and still helps me remember my 3 multiplication tables 25 years after I first heard it).

This song was the premiere episode of School House Rock! Which gives it so much more meaning as to why Halliday chose to use it in his quest.

Besides the fact that Halliday learned that his friendships should have been the most important thing in his life (and why he created the need for the final task to need more than one person to open)… it is such a great symbolism that the first part of something amazing wasn’t about grammar, or history but about what happens when two people come together to make something great—their kid…and suddenly become more than themselves…a family.

And while the song uses the traditional (and outdated) definition of a family it is abundantly clear that Halliday meant that unit to be CHOSEN… your Chosen family. The people you truly love and trust to help you get to where you want to go and succeed.

Faith and Hope and Charity…because Three truly is a Magic number.

Rating:

Rating: 5 out of 5.
Posted in 8-Tracks, Blog Posts, Week of Love

Ladyhawke: The Motion Picture Soundtrack, by Andrew Powell: a Album review

General Information:

-Album Title: Ladyhawke

-Artist: Andrew Powell

-Release Year: 1985

-Album Length:

-Genre: Instrumental Film Score, Medieval Dark Fantasy

-How to Listen: Spotify (with subscription), Apple Music (with subscription), iTunes (for purchase), CD, or look for it at your local library

-Page of Reference in RP1: 106

Lyrics:

NONE…all instrumental

Song Titles:

  1. Main Title
  2. Phillipe’s Escape
  3. The Search for Phillipe
  4. Tavern Fight (Phillipe)
  5. Tavern Fight (Navarre)
  6. Phillipe Describes Isabeau
  7. Navarre’s Ambush
  8. The Chase, the Fall & the Transformation
  9. “She Was Sad at First…”
  10. Navarre Returns to Aquila
  11. Narvarre’s and Marquet’s Duel
  12. Marquet’s Death
  13. Bishop’s Death
  14. End Title

Review:

This is a beautiful soundtrack.  It is one that plays throughout the background of the film and adds an incredible depth to the storyline.  The majority of the music seems to have medieval themes throughout it and many of the moments feel truly like what I imagine life in this time period would have been like (if you had the ability to carry music with you always).

The ups and downs of the score follow the action in ways that enhance, not detract from the story and the action that is going on upon the screen.

This is one of the few scores I can listen to that helps me focus.  Usually I need talking or singing to stimulate my brain well enough to focus but the depth here is just so beautiful that it is easy to listen to in the background.

Rating:

Rating: 4 out of 5.